WW1 Photos Centenary Website: 2014-2018 By Paul Reed

Aftermath: Hooge Crater Cemetery 1920

I recently purchased some more of the George Nightingale & Co Stereocards, produced in Britain around 1920 and sold in aid of ex-servicemen. They give a real insight into the Aftermath of the Great War and they will feature on the site over the next few weeks.

This image shows Hooge Crater Cemetery around 1920. This cemetery had been started by burial officers in October 1917 and there were less than a hundred graves by the end of the war; however it was chosen as one of the sites to become a main concentration cemetery and burials were moved in from 1919 creating a burial ground with more than 2300 graves.

Given the angle of the photograph, it is taken to the rear of the cemetery looking up the slope of the Menin Road Ridge towards Hooge itself. Among the standard wooden crosses with their metal ‘ticker-tape’ name tabs are numerous individualised graves brought in from other cemetery to form the neat rows visible here. Great War period duckboards form the walk way and the gentlemen in the photo is likely to be an early Imperial War Graves Commission gardener.

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4 responses

  1. A great photo. There is just something about seeing all those crosses, compared to the modern stones, that is just so emotive.

    14/05/2012 at 08:26

  2. A raw image. Catastrophically damaged land, weed infested soil, rough rubble just beneath the surface, plank path to the desolate infinity, kept in a carefully-preserved uncompromisingly silent photograph.

    14/05/2012 at 09:09

  3. Such a powerful photograph; the scale, the dereliction. Horrific.

    14/05/2012 at 19:27

  4. Pingback: Aftermath: This Place Was Hooge | Great War Photos

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